Fee-for-Service plans: Like DPPO plans, dental Fee-for-Service plans require you to pay a percentage of the cost of treatment. Your insurance company will pay for the rest. Fee-for-Service plans typically offer the most freedom when it comes to choosing your dentist or dental practice. Fee-for-Service plans may also be more costly, since dentists are not typically reimbursed at the same rate as DPPO dentists.
More than 90 percent of dental insurance policies carry a “missing tooth clause” or a “replacement clause.” Many include at least one of these clauses, but most have both. A missing tooth clause protects the insurance company from paying for the replacement of a tooth that was missing before the policy was in effect. For example, if you lost a tooth before your coverage started and later decided that you would like to have a partial, bridge or implant, the insurance company would not have to pay for that service if they have a missing tooth clause in the plan. A replacement clause is similar except that the insurance company won’t pay to replace procedures such as dentures, partials or bridges until the specified time limit has passed.
If you are changing insurance and want to continue with your current dentist, you can visit the websites of insurance companies you are thinking about signing up with and search to see if your dentist accepts the new type of insurance. However, sometimes these search results aren't updated or only show offices seeking new patients, so you'll want to verify by calling your dental office.

Another option for dental care is Medicaid, which covers some kinds of dental procedures if you meet the requirements. Medicare does not provide dental coverage. The ADA Foundation has provided dental care to 5.5 million children since 2003. They will direct you to a dentist that is near you. Another option is the Children Health Insurance Program (CHIP). It provides health coverage including dental coverage to over 7 million children under 19 years of age.
If you are on a policy that requires you to go to a participating provider, you should not be charged the difference between these two prices. A contracted dentist generally has an agreement with the insurance company to write off the difference in charges. If the policy allows you to go to a dentist or pediatric dentist of your choice, check the insurance company’s UCR fee guide against the fees that dentist charges. You may be required to pay the difference out of your pocket, however, you cannot put a price tag on quality dental care.
The final kind of dental insurance is indemnity dental coverage. These plans allow you to visit any dentist and they will pay a fee for the procedures you have done. They calculate a set amount that they’ll pay for each type of procedure and any additional amount would have to be paid by you out-of-pocket. They also have an annual maximum which can sometimes be higher than other types of plans. One of the downsides is that you have to pay for all the services upfront and submit paperwork in order to get reimbursed.
Does this sound good? Maybe. You’ll pay for everything…at a discount. How does this compare to traditional dental insurance? In our opinion, you may end up paying the same or less, generally speaking. While you have to pay for preventative care, it is at a discount. Compare with dental insurance, which the preventative care is free but you generally pay a higher monthly premium.
MedicareWire.com is an independent research, technology and publishing organization. We are not affiliated with Medicare, Medicare plans, insurance carriers, or healthcare providers, nor are we compensated for Medicare plan enrollments. We are affiliate with the dental savings plans mentioned on this page and may receive compensation if you join a plan. For more information, see our disclosure page.
If you're struggling to find an affordable dental insurance, your state might offer some programs that could help you. Many states have assistance programs for those who are unable to pay for dental care themselves. To find out whether your state has a program, visit the National Association of Dental and Cranialfacial Research, as well as the Association of State and Territorial Dental Directors. Their websites have links and information about how to get low-cost dental care in your state.
More sensitive teeth. Your teeth can become more and more sensitive as you age due to the natural gum receding process. As your gums recede, they expose sensitive areas of your teeth that aren’t protected by enamel. Extreme temperatures may cause more pain and discomfort in these areas. Using toothpaste designed for sensitive teeth should help. If your sensitive teeth continue to be a problem, you should visit your dentist, as your problem may be more serious.
Find a local dentist, access your insurance cards, or provide your doctor with critical information on the go with the Dental Select Mobile ID app. We provide superior dental insurance for seniors, as well as individuals and families, and our mobile app makes it simple for subscribers and covered family members to get the information they need anytime, anywhere.

An example of Delta Dental’s offerings is their Dental for Everyone Gold PPO plan which includes savings that change depending on what year of the plan you're in. When it comes to preventative care, they offer 60% coverage in the first year, 80% in the second year and 100% in the third year and going forward. For basic care, they offer 50% coverage in the first year, 65% of the second year, and 80% in the third year and going forward. For major care, you get 0% coverage in the first year, 30% in the second year, and 50% in the third year.

Humana group dental plans are offered by Humana Insurance Company, HumanaDental Insurance Company, Humana Insurance Company of New York, Humana Health Benefit Plan of Louisiana, The Dental Concern, Inc., Humana Medical Plan of Utah, CompBenefits Company, CompBenefits Insurance Company, CompBenefits Dental, Inc., Humana Employers Health Plan of Georgia, Inc., or DentiCare, Inc. (DBA CompBenefits).
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