My plan covered cavity fillings, but an additional procedure (like a crown or an extraction) would have been costly even with insurance. Multiple appointments also took up a lot of time. I could have spared myself some of those cavities, and long hours in the dentist’s chair, if I’d got regular cleanings in earlier years (and, of course, flossed more often).
When shopping for the best dental plans for seniors, you should consider what services and treatments you might need, the costs of the plan, and what the plan covers. The dental needs of seniors could depend on the condition of their current teeth and their dental history. For example, if you already have full dentures, you may be more concerned about getting checked for oral cancer than in cavity treatment or bridges.

The information and content (collectively, "Content") on this website is for your general educational information only. The Content cannot, and is not intended to, replace the relationship that you have with your health care professionals. The Content on this website is not medical advice. You should always talk to your health care professionals for information concerning diagnosis and treatment, including information regarding which drugs or treatment may be appropriate for you. None of the information on this website represents or warrants that any particular drug or treatment is safe, appropriate or effective for you. Health information changes quickly. Therefore, it is always best to confirm information with your health care professionals.
Our top three choices offer an excellent selection of policies and discounts that can protect your savings without requiring you to pay excessive premiums. The companies service almost all markets in the U.S. Remember that you can probably go out of network to see the dentist you prefer, but you will pay more out of pocket for doing so. If you have a favorite dentist, call their office to ask what dental insurances consider them in-network.
*The plan is insured by Delta Dental Insurance Company (Contract 1230) in AK, AL, DC, DE, FL, GA, LA, MD, MS, MT, NV, NY, PA, PR, TN, TX, UT, VI and WV, insured by Dentegra Insurance Company (Contract 1230) in AR, AZ, CA, CO, CT, HI, IA, ID, IL, IN, KS, KY, ME, MI, MN, MO, NC, ND, NE, NH, NJ, NM, OH, OK, OR, RI, SC, SD, VA, VT, WA, WI and WY, and insured by Dentegra Insurance Company of New England (Contract 1230) in MA. The plan is administered by Delta Dental Insurance Company. For Texas residents your Master Policy Form number is TX-AMD-MC-DPO-D-DC(DELTAUSA1-2005). These companies are financially responsible for their own products.
There can sometimes be significant differences between the dental insurance plans that employers sponsor and those that you obtain as an individual. One big (and obvious) difference is that usually employers pay for part or all of the dental insurance plan, whereas if you're buying a plan by yourself you have to pay for the whole thing. Some employers are also able to get a better deal because they're buying insurance in in bulk for all their employees. But, if you shop around, you could potentially get a plan that is similarly priced or even cheaper.
Another benefit is that you have more flexibility when it comes to choosing what type of plan you want. When you work for an employer, they choose which plan they believe would be right for the majority of their workers. But you might not need the same type of coverage as the person who works in the cubicle next to you. By buying an individual plan, you're able to customize and purchase exactly what you need. For that reason, your coverage can actually be less expensive than if you had an employer-sponsored plan – especially if you had to pay for part of your premiums.
For the most part, Medicare does not cover dental services with the exception of those services that are required due to another covered medical issue. There are exceptions but seniors should not expect Medicare to cover routine dental care or services such as cleaning, extractions, dentures, or even fillings. If you have an alternative insurance to Medicare B then that policy might cover dental, but again, that only works in certain circumstances, such as if you are not yet retired even though you are age 62 or older.
The information and content (collectively, "Content") on this website is for your general educational information only. The Content cannot, and is not intended to, replace the relationship that you have with your health care professionals. The Content on this website is not medical advice. You should always talk to your health care professionals for information concerning diagnosis and treatment, including information regarding which drugs or treatment may be appropriate for you. None of the information on this website represents or warrants that any particular drug or treatment is safe, appropriate or effective for you. Health information changes quickly. Therefore, it is always best to confirm information with your health care professionals.
More sensitive teeth. Your teeth can become more and more sensitive as you age due to the natural gum receding process. As your gums recede, they expose sensitive areas of your teeth that aren’t protected by enamel. Extreme temperatures may cause more pain and discomfort in these areas. Using toothpaste designed for sensitive teeth should help. If your sensitive teeth continue to be a problem, you should visit your dentist, as your problem may be more serious.

In the United States, Participating Provider Network or PPO, also referred to as Preferred Provider Organization, is an organization governed by medical doctors, hospitals, other health centers, and medical care providers. This organization has an agreement with an insurer or the third party administrator to provide health insurance to the people associated with their client at reduced or low rates. Participating Provider Network plan may work similar to a DHMO while using an In-Network facility. However, a PPO allows Out-of-Network or Non-Participating Providers to be used for service. Any difference of fees will become the financial responsibility of the patient, unless otherwise specified.


One of the biggest downsides of paying for your own plan is that your premiums might not be pre-tax as they would be if you were paying for a plan that your employer and your contribution towards the plan was being taken off your paycheck. But, if you own your own business, you can potentially write off those expenses as a business cost and therefore get the same savings.

As people get older, our medical and dental needs grow. It’s just a natural part of life, and so it’s important to take care of your body by giving it the proper care and attention it needs. Regular dentist visits for exams and professional cleanings are a crucial part of dental maintenance. Unfortunately, it seems that finding high quality dental insurance for seniors only gets more difficult.


Often, there is no waiting period in a group plan, like one offered by an employer. Of course, if you were eligible for a company-based plan, you probably wouldn't be shopping around on your own. However, the same privilege might be had in a group plan offered through an organization such as AARP.  With their plans, there's no waiting period for preventative services, at least.   
It is a far too common situation. You enroll in Medicare and have your medical and health needs covered. You feel good. Finally, you made a decision about Medicare. What about dental coverage? Your teeth matter, right? We all know when our teeth and gums hurt, everything hurts! Yet, Medicare and nearly all Medicare Advantage and supplement plans do not cover dental needs. If they do, coverage is usually limited to preventative care only. What will you do about fillings, bridges, and crowns? Luckily, we at My Family Life Insurance have many coverage solutions when it comes to dental needs. In this article, we discuss dental insurance, plan types, what to look for with affordable dental insurance, and the best dental insurance for seniors on Medicare.
Dental insurance almost always picks up 100 percent of the bill for routine checkups and cleanings. Coverage for common procedures like root canals and fillings are typically covered at 80 percent, although policies with higher premiums cover up to 90 percent. You are then responsible for the remaining 10 to 20 percent of the cost, called coinsurance. Most plans cover higher-priced and more involved procedures at 50 percent, so you should have some savings set aside for what your insurance does not cover. Still, with relatively low premiums, having dental insurance is far less expensive on average than paying cash for all dental procedures.
You’ll pay less for your dental needs when you have coverage. Most procedures, even braces and dentures, come at a fraction of the price you’d pay without benefits. We also contract with dentists to offer you discounted rates, so you’ll only pay a portion of those reduced rates. Plus, our DeltaCare USA and Delta Dental PPO plans include a broad range of services to cover your oral health needs.
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