DentalPlans.com provides dental coverage to more than 1 million customers across all 50 states. DentalPlans.com has an extensive network including more than 100,000 dentists across the country. Although DentalPlans.com is not an insurance company they work to reduce the cost of dental repairs, as well as covering those who may need to visit an out-of-network dentist.
They provide discounts on your claims that average around 20.3% in addition to covering a percentage of your costs. Delta Dental Premier works with a network of dentist that offer lower costs on their services which equates to cheaper treatments for you. Dentist in this network are not allowed to bill you additionally after you pay your agreed co-payment or deductible.
Some of the benefits of a Carrington dental plan are the low fees, the fact there is no waiting, and that you can choose your own dentist amongst their network. There are also no limits on your coverage and you don't have to fill out any paperwork. Some downsides are that you will likely end up paying more for your procedures than if you had one of the best dental insurance plans.

AARP and its affiliates are not insurers. AARP does not employ or endorse agents, producers or brokers. AARP Member Advantages is the name for a collection of products, services and insurance programs available to AARP members from trusted third parties. AARP member benefits, including all goods, services and discounts on this site, are provided by third parties, not by AARP and its affiliates. Providers pay a royalty fee to AARP for the use of its intellectual property. These fees are used for the general purposes of AARP. Provider offers are subject to change and may have restrictions. Please contact the provider directly for details.

Most independent dental insurance plans will only pay for your dental services if you go to a contracted and participating in-network dentist. Find out if you are required to go to a participating dentist or if you can choose your own. If the plan requires that you see an In-Network Dentist, ask for a list of the dentists in your area with whom they are contracted so you can decide if they have a dentist you would consider seeing.
People buying their own dental insurance (as opposed to those covered by an employer's plan) sometimes get a nasty surprise when they sign up: a waiting period. Unlike regular health insurance, in which coverage usually starts immediately or at the beginning of the next month, dental plans often come with a delay between enrollment and the actual onset of coverage for some or all services. It could be six months to a year or more.
All dental insurance plans or dental savings plans will charge a different monthly premium. These will vary depending on the number of individuals that you're enrolling in the plan, the type of plan you’re applying for, and the level of coverage you need. Most affordable dental insurance plans will charge you different prices for individuals and children and then, after a certain number of individuals, they just charge a flat family fee.
Does this sound good? Maybe. You’ll pay for everything…at a discount. How does this compare to traditional dental insurance? In our opinion, you may end up paying the same or less, generally speaking. While you have to pay for preventative care, it is at a discount. Compare with dental insurance, which the preventative care is free but you generally pay a higher monthly premium.
Surgery to correct an abscessed tooth is usually considered a health issue and medical insurance covers the cost. Procedures to correct trauma to the mouth are considered medical and not dental, even if lost teeth are involved. Our best advice is to talk to both your medical and dental insurance carriers to determine where coverage falls, so you are prepared for out of pocket costs.
In either case, in our opinion, the purchase of dental insurance can be hard if you don’t do your homework. Why? The premiums aren’t in favor of the benefit. For example, if you are paying $100 per month for dental insurance which has an annual benefit of $1,000, that really isn’t in your best interest. You are paying $1,200 annually for a $1,000 benefit. In this case, it is better to simply negotiate a discount with the dentist or utilize a dental discount plan where appropriate (more on that below).

The longer you stay with Spirit Dental, more each plan pays out and the higher your savings. For example, with one plan’s basic dental procedures are covered at 65 percent the first year, 80 percent the second year and 90 percent the third year. Major procedures on that plan follow the same timeline at 25 to 65 percent coverage. All plans cover preventative care at 100 percent. You can bundle EyeMed vision insurance for $7 per month with each plan.


However, if you do have existing dental issues that require major dental work, then it would be best to find a dental plan without any waiting periods for major services. Fortunately there are a number of plans that fall into this category and allow a growing level of coverage for all services that can begin immediately. At EasyDentalQuotes, some of these plans include the Delta Dental Immediate Coverage plan and plans with Renaissance Dental.

Before deciding to purchase dental insurance, talk with your dentist regarding the extent of your treatment plan. This way you can decide if you would be better off with or without dental insurance. A very important factor to remember regarding any dental insurance plan is that dental insurance is not at all similar to medical insurance. The majority of dental insurance plans are designed with the purpose of only covering the basic dental care around $1,000 to $1,500 (about the same amount that they covered 30 years ago) per year and is not intended to provide comprehensive coverage like that of medical insurance.
Generally Original Medicare dental coverage is only for limited circumstances involving hospitalization. Original Medicare (Part A and Part B) generally doesn’t cover most dental care, including cleanings, fillings, tooth extractions, dentures, and dental plates. Hospital insurance (Part A) may pay for emergency or complicated dental procedures, for example the reconstruction of the jaw following an accidental injury, according to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid services (CMS). According to CMS, Congress has not amended the dental exclusion since 1980, when it made an exception for inpatient hospital services when the dental procedure itself made the hospitalization necessary. If you have Original Medicare and want routine dental care, you will generally need to find a plan from a private insurance company.
Dental insurance plans typically cost more than discount plans, but they make actual plan payments to dental providers. Dental insurance plans usually have an annual benefit maximum of $1000 up to $3000 per year that can be paid out depending on the plan. Though insured dental plans may cost more than discount plans they may be a better solution if you need more dental care or have been accustomed to using dental insurance plans before.
Each plan will provide dental coverage for a variety of dental needs, but are not always the same. What they might or might not cover includes dental services such as root canals, deep cleanings, and restorative procedures. When they do cover these services they do so only partially and the senior must either pay out of pocket or have a secondary dental insurance plan. Most plans for seniors pay for routine care, such as an annual cleaning, but require a copayment or co-insurance for other services.
In either case, in our opinion, the purchase of dental insurance can be hard if you don’t do your homework. Why? The premiums aren’t in favor of the benefit. For example, if you are paying $100 per month for dental insurance which has an annual benefit of $1,000, that really isn’t in your best interest. You are paying $1,200 annually for a $1,000 benefit. In this case, it is better to simply negotiate a discount with the dentist or utilize a dental discount plan where appropriate (more on that below).
You’ll want to go to an in-network dentist as they usually have better, contracted rates. We’ll show an example of that in a minute. Cleaning or preventative care visits are typically covered at 100%. Basic or major services visits are typically covered at 80% and 50%, respectively. What does this mean? If you go to an in-network dentist for a tooth filling (80%) whose contracted rate is $200, you’ll have to pay $40 out of pocket ($200 X (1 – .80)).
You’ll pay less for your dental needs when you have coverage. Most procedures, even braces and dentures, come at a fraction of the price you’d pay without benefits. We also contract with dentists to offer you discounted rates, so you’ll only pay a portion of those reduced rates. Plus, our DeltaCare USA and Delta Dental PPO plans include a broad range of services to cover your oral health needs.
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