Generally Original Medicare dental coverage is only for limited circumstances involving hospitalization. Original Medicare (Part A and Part B) generally doesn’t cover most dental care, including cleanings, fillings, tooth extractions, dentures, and dental plates. Hospital insurance (Part A) may pay for emergency or complicated dental procedures, for example the reconstruction of the jaw following an accidental injury, according to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid services (CMS). According to CMS, Congress has not amended the dental exclusion since 1980, when it made an exception for inpatient hospital services when the dental procedure itself made the hospitalization necessary. If you have Original Medicare and want routine dental care, you will generally need to find a plan from a private insurance company.
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Find a local dentist, access your insurance cards, or provide your doctor with critical information on the go with the Dental Select Mobile ID app. We provide superior dental insurance for seniors, as well as individuals and families, and our mobile app makes it simple for subscribers and covered family members to get the information they need anytime, anywhere.
Although discount plans are also sold by private companies, they are not insurance plans. There are no copays, coinsurance, or deductible amounts. That also means that there are no pre-negotiated rates or free yearly checkups and cleanings. A participating dentist simply agrees to offer discounts (often a percentage off from the total price) for certain medical services. Then, seniors who choose discount plans will pay their dentist directly for the cost of services (after the discount).
Preventive care may seem optional if you have healthy teeth and good oral hygiene, but it saves money in the long run. I went without dental insurance for three years in my twenties, and did what most of my peers did in that situation – simply didn’t visit the dentist. Then I enrolled in a graduate program which required students to have medical and dental coverage. At my first dental visit, I had numerous cavities. Getting them all filled required nine or ten appointments in the nine months of my academic year.
No matter which type of plan you choose, we recommend that you carefully review your contract so you know exactly what your insurance will cover. Additionally, in most cases your dentist's office will be familiar with what your insurance may or may not cover. Since many dental offices will require you to pay the estimated uncovered balance upfront, you will need to make sure you know what that is in advance so you can plan your budget. If you cannot cover the remaining balance you may want to ask if your dentist provides financing.
Does this sound good? Maybe. You’ll pay for everything…at a discount. How does this compare to traditional dental insurance? In our opinion, you may end up paying the same or less, generally speaking. While you have to pay for preventative care, it is at a discount. Compare with dental insurance, which the preventative care is free but you generally pay a higher monthly premium.
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* Premium initial quote for basic and premiere benefit level. Actual benefits and rates vary by state. The supplemental benefits referenced are taken from PPO Dental Policy Form CH DEN PPO TX 417, or its state variation which is underwritten by The Chesapeake Life Insurance Company. Administrative offices located in North Richland Hills, TX. Product availability varies by state. A complete list of benefits, exclusions and limitations is available upon request. Please contact a licensed agent and refer to the Policy.
They provide discounts on your claims that average around 20.3% in addition to covering a percentage of your costs. Delta Dental Premier works with a network of dentist that offer lower costs on their services which equates to cheaper treatments for you. Dentist in this network are not allowed to bill you additionally after you pay your agreed co-payment or deductible.
*The plan is insured by Delta Dental Insurance Company (Contract 1230) in AK, AL, DC, DE, FL, GA, LA, MD, MS, MT, NV, NY, PA, PR, TN, TX, UT, VI and WV, insured by Dentegra Insurance Company (Contract 1230) in AR, AZ, CA, CO, CT, HI, IA, ID, IL, IN, KS, KY, ME, MI, MN, MO, NC, ND, NE, NH, NJ, NM, OH, OK, OR, RI, SC, SD, VA, VT, WA, WI and WY, and insured by Dentegra Insurance Company of New England (Contract 1230) in MA. The plan is administered by Delta Dental Insurance Company. For Texas residents your Master Policy Form number is TX-AMD-MC-DPO-D-DC(DELTAUSA1-2005). These companies are financially responsible for their own products.

These dental schools either offer discounts or provide free dental services in order to get patients they can practice on. While they do all sorts of different procedures, it’s probably best to go to them for more routine care like cleanings, check ups, x-rays, and small cavities. If you have a more complex procedure to get done, you might better off going to an expert instead.

This information is provided by Ameritas Life Insurance Corp. (Ameritas Life). This provides a very brief description of some of the important features of this insurance policy. It is not the insurance policy and does not represent it. A full explanation of benefits, exceptions and limitations is contained in the Individual Dental Policy Form Indiv. 9000 Rev. 07-16 and Vision Policy Form Indiv. 9000 Ed. 07-16-V. Premium rates may change upon renewal. This policy is renewable at the option of the insured. This product may not be available in all states and is subject to individual state regulations.

The downside of using a dental school is that it can sometimes take a lot more time to get the work done since it’s a learning environment, the hours or days that they practice are limited, and it can be hard to get your insurance coverage to pay for work performed at a dental school if you have insurance. You’ll likely have to pay for your treatment out-of-pocket and get reimbursed later.

It is a far too common situation. You enroll in Medicare and have your medical and health needs covered. You feel good. Finally, you made a decision about Medicare. What about dental coverage? Your teeth matter, right? We all know when our teeth and gums hurt, everything hurts! Yet, Medicare and nearly all Medicare Advantage and supplement plans do not cover dental needs. If they do, coverage is usually limited to preventative care only. What will you do about fillings, bridges, and crowns? Luckily, we at My Family Life Insurance have many coverage solutions when it comes to dental needs. In this article, we discuss dental insurance, plan types, what to look for with affordable dental insurance, and the best dental insurance for seniors on Medicare.

The cost estimates provided may be different from your actual costs for several reasons, including but not limited to, your unique dental circumstances and the decisions made by you and your dental professionals as to what services you will receive, deviations between the anticipated scope of services and the services actually provided, and the characteristics of your particular plan.
Another option for dental care is Medicaid, which covers some kinds of dental procedures if you meet the requirements. Medicare does not provide dental coverage. The ADA Foundation has provided dental care to 5.5 million children since 2003. They will direct you to a dentist that is near you. Another option is the Children Health Insurance Program (CHIP). It provides health coverage including dental coverage to over 7 million children under 19 years of age.

It's possible to purchase a dental-only insurance plan. You'll have to pay a monthly premium, but the cost will be offset by lower out-of-pocket fees. Most of these dental plans require that you see an in-network dentist who may offer lower rates than out-of-network providers. Some plans let you go to any dentist (in- or out-of-network), but you may have to pay more for their services.

Dental insurance companies divide benefits, services, or procedures into categories and refer to them with American Dental Association (ADA) 3-4 digit code. As an example, Preventative and Diagnostic procedures often include exams (ADA code 0120), x-rays (ADA code 0210), and basic cleanings or prophylaxis (ADA code 1110). Basic procedures often include fillings, periodontics, endodontics, and oral surgery. Major procedures often are crowns, dentures, and implants. Procedures such as periodontics, endodontics, and oral surgery may be considered major, depending on the policy.
Humana group dental plans are offered by Humana Insurance Company, HumanaDental Insurance Company, Humana Insurance Company of New York, Humana Health Benefit Plan of Louisiana, The Dental Concern, Inc., Humana Medical Plan of Utah, CompBenefits Company, CompBenefits Insurance Company, CompBenefits Dental, Inc., Humana Employers Health Plan of Georgia, Inc., or DentiCare, Inc. (DBA CompBenefits).
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