People buying their own dental insurance (as opposed to those covered by an employer's plan) sometimes get a nasty surprise when they sign up: a waiting period. Unlike regular health insurance, in which coverage usually starts immediately or at the beginning of the next month, dental plans often come with a delay between enrollment and the actual onset of coverage for some or all services. It could be six months to a year or more.
Surgery to correct an abscessed tooth is usually considered a health issue and medical insurance covers the cost. Procedures to correct trauma to the mouth are considered medical and not dental, even if lost teeth are involved. Our best advice is to talk to both your medical and dental insurance carriers to determine where coverage falls, so you are prepared for out of pocket costs.

Almost all dental insurance companies use what is called a Usual, Customary, and Reasonable (UCR) fee guide. This means that they set their own price that they will allow for every dental procedure that they cover. This is not based on what a dentist actually charges, but what the dental insurance company wishes to cover. For example, your dentist may charge $78 for a dental cleaning, but your insurance company will only allow $58 because that is the UCR fee that they have set.
We have multiple plans with different levels of benefits to help you find the best dental insurance fit for your budget.3 So if you’ve ever bought a gym membership or a treadmill to help remind you to take care of yourself, supplemental dental insurance from UnitedHealthcare can be that reminder to take care of your teeth. Even better, it can help you plan, control and budget for the costs of your dental care.
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