Like most kinds of health or ancillary medical insurance, there are deductibles involved in dental insurance. Generally, the deductibles are per individual or per family depending on your plan. Some companies require that you meet the deductible on each member of your family while others have a family amount that you have to hit – no matter who the person receiving the care was. Deductibles can range anywhere from $100 to $500 or more. Obviously, the higher your deductible, the less likely you’ll be to take full advantage of your insurance.

Copyright © 2011–2018 Delta Dental of Tennessee | All Rights Reserved | 240 Venture Circle, Nashville, TN 37228 | (800) 223-3104 The information provided on this site is for general education purposes only and is not intended as a diagnosis, treatment, or a substitute for professional medical or dental advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Consult your dentist or physician for information or treatment specific to you and your health.
Copyright © 2011–2018 Delta Dental of Tennessee | All Rights Reserved | 240 Venture Circle, Nashville, TN 37228 | (800) 223-3104 The information provided on this site is for general education purposes only and is not intended as a diagnosis, treatment, or a substitute for professional medical or dental advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Consult your dentist or physician for information or treatment specific to you and your health.
Your Current Dental Health – Do you have pending dental needs, such as needing dentures, extractions, crown replacement, etc? This is all about the state of your mouth, teeth, and oral tissue today and for the next six months. That time frame is important because many dental insurance policies have a waiting period before you can use their benefits. For most, that period is six months.
The cost of not taking care of your oral health could be more. Those without individual dental coverage are less likely to get routine dental care, meaning they seek out a dentist only when they have a problem. By then, more extensive and more expensive measures may be necessary, and major problems linked to poor oral health (like heart disease and diabetes) are more likely to appear.2 Doing nothing now means you might pay more later.
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