One example of a Humana insurance plan is their Dental Loyalty Plus package that has a one time deductible of $150 per person or $450 for family. Unlike other plans where the deductible must be paid annually, their deductible lasts as long as you keep the plan. The maximum benefits of the plan in the first year are $1,000, in the second year are $1,250, and in the third year are $1,500. Preventative services are covered at 100%, basic services start with coverage at 40%, but coverage goes up to 70% by the third year, and major services start at 20% coverage and go up to 50% coverage by the third year.
If you are a senior or are approaching retirement, you may be surprised to find out that Medicare does not provide coverage for routine dental care. Medicare mainly covers medical treatments, but does not provide any assistance for routine dental care such as bi-annual exams, cleanings, or even major services like bridges or dentures. This leaves it to seniors to search for a dental plan that can meet their coverage needs.

For the most part, Medicare does not cover dental services with the exception of those services that are required due to another covered medical issue. There are exceptions but seniors should not expect Medicare to cover routine dental care or services such as cleaning, extractions, dentures, or even fillings. If you have an alternative insurance to Medicare B then that policy might cover dental, but again, that only works in certain circumstances, such as if you are not yet retired even though you are age 62 or older.

Most Medicare or Medicare Advantage Plans provide no dental coverage or only provide minimal dental coverage. Those that do provide coverage, usually only cover preventive services so many seniors find the need to buy a dental insurance policy. Some top considerations for seniors purchasing a dental insurance plan include in-network providers, types of services covered, deductibles and co-pays. We done some comparisons and come up with some of the best dental insurance options for seniors in 2018.
The cost of not taking care of your oral health could be more. Those without individual dental coverage are less likely to get routine dental care, meaning they seek out a dentist only when they have a problem. By then, more extensive and more expensive measures may be necessary, and major problems linked to poor oral health (like heart disease and diabetes) are more likely to appear.2 Doing nothing now means you might pay more later.
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