As time passes, many seniors leave dental coverage (and vision and hearing) behind. Then, when they need it, it is too late. Waiting can be devastating in some cases as many insurances have waiting periods for certain services. For example, a routine filling for a cavity typically requires a 6-month wait. If you can’t wait that long, you will have to pay the cost in full.

Choosing a plan that’s right for you depends on many factors, including the ages and number of people in your family, and whether you or a family member needs orthodontic care. Some dental plans provide low copays, while others provide discounts on services. No matter which plan you select, you’ll have access to a large network of dental providers.


If you go to an out-of-network dentist, then the plan usually pays based on the UCR fee. For example, if the dentist charges $250 for the filling, but the UCR in your area is $150, you could end up paying more. In this case, $130 ($250 – $150 X (.80)). This also introduces the concept of balanced billing, which means paying the dentist the cost difference between their rate ($250 in this case) and the cost-sharing rate ($120).
You may have a preexisting oral health condition that is not covered by your current dental policy. Because discount plans are not insurance, they have no waiting periods. You can sign up today and be at the dentist in 30 minutes. If you’ve reached your annual maximum, you can use a discount plan to pay for a procedure you have been reluctant to get because of the out-of-pocket expense.
The downside of using a dental school is that it can sometimes take a lot more time to get the work done since it’s a learning environment, the hours or days that they practice are limited, and it can be hard to get your insurance coverage to pay for work performed at a dental school if you have insurance. You’ll likely have to pay for your treatment out-of-pocket and get reimbursed later.
While we conducted extensive research, we cannot tell you exactly what your new dental plan premium will be or what it will cover. Premiums vary by zip code, age, plan type and other factors. Our reviews can tell you generally what to expect from the dental insurance companies we reviewed, but we cannot predict your exact situation. To calculate average premiums we gathered quotes from numerous areas across the nation; we chose zip codes from large metropolitan areas and from smaller cities of around 150K. We looked for premium rates for one, two and three persons. We made note of the lowest and highest premiums quoted and excluded dental discount plans and preventive-only plans. The sample terms and conditions are common scenarios, but again, these vary depending on the plans available in your area.
UnitedHealthcare has a large number on in-network preferred providers, over 200,000, so you won’t have any trouble finding a dentist in the plan. Cleanings and X-rays are covered 100 percent. Here are the charges you pay for basic services: exam - $25; root canal - 50 percent; fililngs - 30 percent; extractions - 30 percent. The coverage has no age maximum limitations. Deductible limits are $50 - individual, $150 - family of three with a 6-12 month waiting period for certain services. Cleanings and X-rays are covered with zero co-pay or deductible twice yearly.
Under the federal law, dental benefits are an optional service for state Medicaid programs. States can include adult dental benefits in their Medicaid programs. Many states do provide dental benefits for adults; however the status and extent of those benefits vary by state and by year, depending on the availability of state funds to support such benefits.
For freedom of choice, there are a few types of plans to consider including PPO dental plans and Indemnity plans. PPO dental plans generally allow members to see any dentist, but they also include a listing of In Network dentists. With PPO’s you typically get more value if you see an In Network provider, but you can still choose to see an Out of Network provider too. Though Out of Network providers can bill for additional charges if they wish.
While we conducted extensive research, we cannot tell you exactly what your new dental plan premium will be or what it will cover. Premiums vary by zip code, age, plan type and other factors. Our reviews can tell you generally what to expect from the dental insurance companies we reviewed, but we cannot predict your exact situation. To calculate average premiums we gathered quotes from numerous areas across the nation; we chose zip codes from large metropolitan areas and from smaller cities of around 150K. We looked for premium rates for one, two and three persons. We made note of the lowest and highest premiums quoted and excluded dental discount plans and preventive-only plans. The sample terms and conditions are common scenarios, but again, these vary depending on the plans available in your area.
Dental Preferred Provider Organization (DPPO) plans: DPPO plans offer you more choice when it comes to dentists. PPO networks include a variety of dentists that agree to treat patients with DPPO insurance at lower rates. Typically, patients with DPPO have to pay a deductible. When seeing a dentist in your DPPO network, you will usually pay a percentage of the lower rate for treatment. Your insurance company will pay for the rest.
The downside of using a dental school is that it can sometimes take a lot more time to get the work done since it’s a learning environment, the hours or days that they practice are limited, and it can be hard to get your insurance coverage to pay for work performed at a dental school if you have insurance. You’ll likely have to pay for your treatment out-of-pocket and get reimbursed later.
Preventive care is 100% covered with 2 exams and 3 cleanings free per year. There is a $100 deductible that you only pay once for the life of your plan. After the deductible is met, the plans cover between 80% to 90% of all basic care and 50% to 65% of major work including crowns, bridges, implants, and root canals. Orthodontia is covered at 50% and all plans are highly affordable, with their lowest individual plan often running at less than $115 per month depending on your region. Their highest-tier plan offers a $5,000 maximum benefit per year but isn’t available in every state.
*The plan is insured by Delta Dental Insurance Company (Contract 1230) in AK, AL, DC, DE, FL, GA, LA, MD, MS, MT, NV, NY, PA, PR, TN, TX, UT, VI and WV, insured by Dentegra Insurance Company (Contract 1230) in AR, AZ, CA, CO, CT, HI, IA, ID, IL, IN, KS, KY, ME, MI, MN, MO, NC, ND, NE, NH, NJ, NM, OH, OK, OR, RI, SC, SD, VA, VT, WA, WI and WY, and insured by Dentegra Insurance Company of New England (Contract 1230) in MA. The plan is administered by Delta Dental Insurance Company. For Texas residents your Master Policy Form number is TX-AMD-MC-DPO-D-DC(DELTAUSA1-2005). These companies are financially responsible for their own products.
MedicareWire.com is an independent research, technology and publishing organization. We are not affiliated with Medicare, Medicare plans, insurance carriers, or healthcare providers, nor are we compensated for Medicare plan enrollments. We are affiliate with the dental savings plans mentioned on this page and may receive compensation if you join a plan. For more information, see our disclosure page.
Humana group dental plans are offered by Humana Insurance Company, HumanaDental Insurance Company, Humana Insurance Company of New York, Humana Health Benefit Plan of Louisiana, The Dental Concern, Inc., Humana Medical Plan of Utah, CompBenefits Company, CompBenefits Insurance Company, CompBenefits Dental, Inc., Humana Employers Health Plan of Georgia, Inc., or DentiCare, Inc. (DBA CompBenefits).
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