Surgery to correct an abscessed tooth is usually considered a health issue and medical insurance covers the cost. Procedures to correct trauma to the mouth are considered medical and not dental, even if lost teeth are involved. Our best advice is to talk to both your medical and dental insurance carriers to determine where coverage falls, so you are prepared for out of pocket costs.
You may have a preexisting oral health condition that is not covered by your current dental policy. Because discount plans are not insurance, they have no waiting periods. You can sign up today and be at the dentist in 30 minutes. If you’ve reached your annual maximum, you can use a discount plan to pay for a procedure you have been reluctant to get because of the out-of-pocket expense.
There are few procedures that most insurance companies will not cover or only provide a discount for. Most individual dental insurance plans do not cover what might be considered cosmetic procedures such as tooth-colored fillings on molar or bicuspid teeth, dental implants or adult cosmetic orthodontics. The majority of dental companies will also limit how often certain appliances can be replaced and, in most cases, will not replace lost items. The limitations are published in the disclosures and contracts for the plan, many of which you can peruse online. Keep in mind that a new dental insurance plan is not going to cover an emergency you are experiencing right now; most have a waiting period of six to 12 months for major work. (However, some will waive the waiting period if you recently had dental insurance.) Dental groups that offer dental discount plans will let you use your benefits right away, but they only provide a discount and not full coverage. Full coverage plans will however cover your initial evaluation so you can start planning your dental procedures.

Blue Cross Blue Shield has a plan called BlueCare that does not have a waiting period for preventative services and many non-surgical procedures. United Healthcare's United Health One is another. Major surgical treatments and restorative work do require some wait time, though that can be curtailed to some extent if you're coming off another dental plan.
Generally Original Medicare dental coverage is only for limited circumstances involving hospitalization. Original Medicare (Part A and Part B) generally doesn’t cover most dental care, including cleanings, fillings, tooth extractions, dentures, and dental plates. Hospital insurance (Part A) may pay for emergency or complicated dental procedures, for example the reconstruction of the jaw following an accidental injury, according to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid services (CMS). According to CMS, Congress has not amended the dental exclusion since 1980, when it made an exception for inpatient hospital services when the dental procedure itself made the hospitalization necessary. If you have Original Medicare and want routine dental care, you will generally need to find a plan from a private insurance company.
The final kind of dental insurance is indemnity dental coverage. These plans allow you to visit any dentist and they will pay a fee for the procedures you have done. They calculate a set amount that they’ll pay for each type of procedure and any additional amount would have to be paid by you out-of-pocket. They also have an annual maximum which can sometimes be higher than other types of plans. One of the downsides is that you have to pay for all the services upfront and submit paperwork in order to get reimbursed.
Most full coverage dental insurance plans will cover two preventive maintenance visits per year without requiring a deductible payment. Most require a $50 deductible per person, per year to help cover costs beyond your preventive exams. If you need work done, most plans will cover a part of the costs. We looked at root canals specifically and found that the majority of dental plans will cover about half the cost, which may not seem like a lot, but paying half is better than paying upfront for an $800 root canal. However, keep in mind that most insurance policies, depending on your plan, top out at about $1000 to $1500 per year. Using conservative estimates that might be one or two root canals. If you need extensive work done you might have to pay the remaining amount out of pocket.
« BackeHealth Insurance Resource CenterDental InsuranceDental Insurance for SeniorsDental Insurance for Seniors April 20, 2015 Learn about dental care concerns later in life, and dental insurance for seniors. ShareSenior citizens sometimes need special dental care. As we age, our teeth and gums are more susceptible to decay, inflammation, and disease. Health problems, like osteoporosis, diabetes, heart disease, stroke, and respiratory disease can also affect dental health, and sometimes the reverse is true, according to the Columbia University College of Dental Medicine and the American Dental Association.Why to consider dental insurance for seniorsOut of all out-of-pocket health-care costs, 27% of expenses are related to dental services, according to the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation; some people delay needed dental care because of the expense.Dental insurance isn’t usually included in major medical insurance policies, such as you may have from your employer. You can buy a stand-alone dental plan to cover some of your dental care costs.Keep in mind that dental insurance often requires a waiting period for more expensive treatments, so it’s best not to wait until you need dental insurance to get it.Standard dental policiesYou can buy a standard individual dental insurance plan, usually at a low monthly premium. Standard policies commonly cover these routine procedures, typically performed by family dentists:Regular cleanings and exams: Most policies entitle you to a free cleaning and comprehensive exam twice a year.X-rays: Dentists periodically take bitewing X-rays of your teeth. Depending on your dental insurance plan, x-rays may be fully covered, or you might make a copayment. Other X-rays of your mouth may require a copayment, coinsurance, or deductible.Fillings and extractions: Fillings (removal of decay and filling with a bonding material) and extractions (pulling a tooth out of your mouth) usually require a copayment, coinsurance or deductible in most dental insurance plans.Certain repairs: Standard individual dental insurance plans occasionally include partial coverage on some restorative procedures, such as root canals, crowns, bridges, and deep cleanings. Dental insurance plans usually require a copayment, coinsurance or deductible for these procedures, if they cover them. However, you might need to shop around for a policy that covers these more expensive services.  wp_cta_load_variation( '10789', '' )#cta_container{ border: 1px solid #dbdbdb; border-radius: 5px; } #wp_cta_10789_variation_0 #cta_container #content {background: transparent;}
In order to save the most with your Humana plan, you'll have to use a dentist in their network, although they do offer you the ability to use dentists outside their network if you’re willing to pay higher fees. If you want to see a specialist, you will need to get a referral from your primary care dentist. They also offer dental savings plans which are dental discount plans rather than insurance. These plans provide discounts on your dental procedures of up to 45%.
Our top three choices offer an excellent selection of policies and discounts that can protect your savings without requiring you to pay excessive premiums. The companies service almost all markets in the U.S. Remember that you can probably go out of network to see the dentist you prefer, but you will pay more out of pocket for doing so. If you have a favorite dentist, call their office to ask what dental insurances consider them in-network.
Almost all dental insurance companies use what is called a Usual, Customary, and Reasonable (UCR) fee guide. This means that they set their own price that they will allow for every dental procedure that they cover. This is not based on what a dentist actually charges, but what the dental insurance company wishes to cover. For example, your dentist may charge $78 for a dental cleaning, but your insurance company will only allow $58 because that is the UCR fee that they have set.
One example of a plan that is offered through eHealth is the Dominion Dental Services PPO Discount plan which has no deductible. They provide 100% coverage on most preventative and diagnostic procedures and 45% to 60% coverage on all other procedures including children’s orthodontics. They have no maximum annual benefit and they have no waiting period for things like cleaning, extractions, x-rays, and oral surgery but they have waiting periods but you have to use a dentist within their network.

Finding dental insurance for seniors doesn’t need to be an ordeal. Our customized senior dental insurance plans offer a variety of options designed specifically for the unique dental needs of seniors. And with additional savings and discounts, including EyeMed Discount Vision and Connection Hearing, your benefits are comprehensive and affordable. Our senior plans start at as low as $33 a month.
Individual and family medical and dental insurance plans are insured by Cigna Health and Life Insurance Company (CHLIC), Cigna HealthCare of Arizona, Inc., Cigna HealthCare of Illinois, Inc., and Cigna HealthCare of North Carolina, Inc. Group health insurance and health benefit plans are insured or administered by CHLIC, Connecticut General Life Insurance Company (CGLIC), or their affiliates (see a listing of the legal entities that insure or administer group HMO, dental HMO, and other products or services in your state). Group Universal Life (GUL) insurance plans are insured by CGLIC. Life (other than GUL), accident, critical illness, hospital indemnity, and disability plans are insured or administered by Life Insurance Company of North America, except in NY, where insured plans are offered by Cigna Life Insurance Company of New York (New York, NY). All insurance policies and group benefit plans contain exclusions and limitations. For availability, costs and complete details of coverage, contact a licensed agent or Cigna sales representative. This website is not intended for residents of New Mexico.
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