Disclaimer: At LendEDU, we strive to keep information listed on our site accurate and up to date. The information provided on LendEDU may be different than what you see when you visit a financial institution, service provider or specific product’s site. All financial products, shopping products and services are presented without warranty. When evaluating offers, please review the financial institution’s Terms and Conditions. Product name, logo, brands, and other trademarks featured or referred to within LendEDU are the property of their respective trademark holders. Information obtained via LendEDU is for educational purposes only. Please consult a licensed financial professional before making any financial decisions. This site may be compensated through third party advertisers. This site is not endorsed or affiliated with the U.S. Department of Education.
2Delta Dental PPO is underwritten by Delta Dental Insurance Company in AL, DC, FL, GA, LA, MS, MT, NV and UT and by not-for-profit dental service companies in these states: CA – Delta Dental of California; PA, MD – Delta Dental of Pennsylvania; NY – Delta Dental of New York, Inc.; DE – Delta Dental of Delaware, Inc.; WV – Delta Dental of West Virginia, Inc. In Texas, Delta Dental Insurance Company provides a Dental Provider Organization (DPO) plan.
« BackeHealth Insurance Resource CenterDental InsuranceDental Insurance for SeniorsDental Insurance for Seniors April 20, 2015 Learn about dental care concerns later in life, and dental insurance for seniors. ShareSenior citizens sometimes need special dental care. As we age, our teeth and gums are more susceptible to decay, inflammation, and disease. Health problems, like osteoporosis, diabetes, heart disease, stroke, and respiratory disease can also affect dental health, and sometimes the reverse is true, according to the Columbia University College of Dental Medicine and the American Dental Association.Why to consider dental insurance for seniorsOut of all out-of-pocket health-care costs, 27% of expenses are related to dental services, according to the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation; some people delay needed dental care because of the expense.Dental insurance isn’t usually included in major medical insurance policies, such as you may have from your employer. You can buy a stand-alone dental plan to cover some of your dental care costs.Keep in mind that dental insurance often requires a waiting period for more expensive treatments, so it’s best not to wait until you need dental insurance to get it.Standard dental policiesYou can buy a standard individual dental insurance plan, usually at a low monthly premium. Standard policies commonly cover these routine procedures, typically performed by family dentists:Regular cleanings and exams: Most policies entitle you to a free cleaning and comprehensive exam twice a year.X-rays: Dentists periodically take bitewing X-rays of your teeth. Depending on your dental insurance plan, x-rays may be fully covered, or you might make a copayment. Other X-rays of your mouth may require a copayment, coinsurance, or deductible.Fillings and extractions: Fillings (removal of decay and filling with a bonding material) and extractions (pulling a tooth out of your mouth) usually require a copayment, coinsurance or deductible in most dental insurance plans.Certain repairs: Standard individual dental insurance plans occasionally include partial coverage on some restorative procedures, such as root canals, crowns, bridges, and deep cleanings. Dental insurance plans usually require a copayment, coinsurance or deductible for these procedures, if they cover them. However, you might need to shop around for a policy that covers these more expensive services.  wp_cta_load_variation( '10789', '' )#cta_container{ border: 1px solid #dbdbdb; border-radius: 5px; } #wp_cta_10789_variation_0 #cta_container #content {background: transparent;}
The Mayo Clinic advises that poor dental health significantly impacts your physical health, including causing heart disease and endocarditis, an infection of the heart’s inner lining. Diseases which often affect us as we age like osteoporosis, diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis, to name a few, frequently cause dental problems that eventually become too painful to ignore. Seniors often need more dental care than younger generations because of softening bones and teeth or a dry mouth, which can lead to an assortment of oral health problems. Regular visits to the dentist can save money down the road while reducing the risk of painful dental problems.
Generally Original Medicare dental coverage is only for limited circumstances involving hospitalization. Original Medicare (Part A and Part B) generally doesn’t cover most dental care, including cleanings, fillings, tooth extractions, dentures, and dental plates. Hospital insurance (Part A) may pay for emergency or complicated dental procedures, for example the reconstruction of the jaw following an accidental injury, according to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid services (CMS). According to CMS, Congress has not amended the dental exclusion since 1980, when it made an exception for inpatient hospital services when the dental procedure itself made the hospitalization necessary. If you have Original Medicare and want routine dental care, you will generally need to find a plan from a private insurance company.
You may have a preexisting oral health condition that is not covered by your current dental policy. Because discount plans are not insurance, they have no waiting periods. You can sign up today and be at the dentist in 30 minutes. If you’ve reached your annual maximum, you can use a discount plan to pay for a procedure you have been reluctant to get because of the out-of-pocket expense.
Does this sound good? Maybe. You’ll pay for everything…at a discount. How does this compare to traditional dental insurance? In our opinion, you may end up paying the same or less, generally speaking. While you have to pay for preventative care, it is at a discount. Compare with dental insurance, which the preventative care is free but you generally pay a higher monthly premium.

Our health benefit plans, dental plans, vision plans, life and supplemental plans, workplace voluntary benefit products, long term disability plans, and short term disability plans have exclusions, limitations, and terms under which the coverage may be continued in force or discontinued. Our dental plans, vision plans, life and supplemental plans, workplace voluntary benefit products, long term disability plans, and short term disability plans may also have waiting periods. For costs and complete details of coverage, call or write Humana or your Humana insurance agent or broker.
There are many insurance companies that offer dental services to seniors. Many are part of the group of insurance companies that fall under Medicare part C. While every insurance company under Medicare Part C offers the same medical coverage as Medicare Part A and Part B, they sometimes offer additional services such as dental coverage. Even so, the types of dental coverages that they offer are not identical.
One of their popular dental plans is the DentalGuard Preferred Plan. It provides 100% coverage on preventative and basic services, and 0% coverage on major or orthodontic care. If you have a premium plan, you can receive 50% coverage on those services. They do have an annual maximum of $1,000 and limits on how many cleanings or maintenance procedures that you can have in a one year period.
You’ll want to go to an in-network dentist as they usually have better, contracted rates. We’ll show an example of that in a minute. Cleaning or preventative care visits are typically covered at 100%. Basic or major services visits are typically covered at 80% and 50%, respectively. What does this mean? If you go to an in-network dentist for a tooth filling (80%) whose contracted rate is $200, you’ll have to pay $40 out of pocket ($200 X (1 – .80)).

I could have paid the average of $360 a year for a dental policy in my twenties. Or I could have paid out of pocket for two dental exams, including cleanings and X-rays, which, in 2011, cost an average of $370 combined. In that case dental insurance wouldn’t have saved me much money. And if I went to a dental school or clinic for treatment, I could have saved even more on out-of-pocket costs.
You want to make sure that the plan that you get has great customer service so that if you have a problem you will be able to get the help that you need. Check their website to see whether they have a phone number, e-mail address, or instant messaging service that allows you to contact them. Do a quick internet search to see what people are saying about their customer service.
Before deciding to purchase dental insurance, talk with your dentist regarding the extent of your treatment plan. This way you can decide if you would be better off with or without dental insurance. A very important factor to remember regarding any dental insurance plan is that dental insurance is not at all similar to medical insurance. The majority of dental insurance plans are designed with the purpose of only covering the basic dental care around $1,000 to $1,500 (about the same amount that they covered 30 years ago) per year and is not intended to provide comprehensive coverage like that of medical insurance.
*Examples only. These are the average costs the patient will pay per procedure with an in-network provider and are based on averages across Atlanta, Cincinnati, Los Angeles, Manhattan and Saint Louis. Actual costs and savings may vary by provider, geographic area, and service received. There are limitations and exclusions to the discount available. For example, general anesthesia, implants, and/or cosmetic dentistry are not discounted services. Upon purchase, refer to your policy for more information on the limitations and exclusions that apply. Coinsurance listed is for Prime Plan C.

As time passes, many seniors leave dental coverage (and vision and hearing) behind. Then, when they need it, it is too late. Waiting can be devastating in some cases as many insurances have waiting periods for certain services. For example, a routine filling for a cavity typically requires a 6-month wait. If you can’t wait that long, you will have to pay the cost in full.


One of the biggest downsides of paying for your own plan is that your premiums might not be pre-tax as they would be if you were paying for a plan that your employer and your contribution towards the plan was being taken off your paycheck. But, if you own your own business, you can potentially write off those expenses as a business cost and therefore get the same savings.
An example of Delta Dental’s offerings is their Dental for Everyone Gold PPO plan which includes savings that change depending on what year of the plan you're in. When it comes to preventative care, they offer 60% coverage in the first year, 80% in the second year and 100% in the third year and going forward. For basic care, they offer 50% coverage in the first year, 65% of the second year, and 80% in the third year and going forward. For major care, you get 0% coverage in the first year, 30% in the second year, and 50% in the third year.
Most dental insurance companies have a waiting period after your application is accepted. This practice is so the customer doesn’t wait until they have accumulated the need for several procedures to buy and use dental insurance to cover the costs. Most plans have a waiting period for some procedures but not others, like a regular checkup. One of our best dental insurance companies has no waiting period for just about any procedure.
Another thing to consider when looking for dental plans for seniors is the waiting period some plans may have for certain services. For example, a plan may set a 3-month waiting period for an extraction. This means that if you get an extraction a week after enrolling in that plan, you usually won’t be covered. Some services may have longer waiting periods, such as 15 months, before the plan covers that service. This is why it is best to not wait until you have a dental emergency to enroll in a dental insurance plan.
When you near the age of 65, you need to sign up for Medicare. However, Medicare does not cover preventative dental care or other procedures such as fillings, tooth extractions, dentures or other dental devices. If you have a complicated or emergency dental procedure that requires hospitalization, Medicare Part A will likely cover the cost, but it is obviously preferable to avoid hospitalization if you can with regularly-scheduled dental care.
We have multiple plans with different levels of benefits to help you find the best dental insurance fit for your budget.3 So if you’ve ever bought a gym membership or a treadmill to help remind you to take care of yourself, supplemental dental insurance from UnitedHealthcare can be that reminder to take care of your teeth. Even better, it can help you plan, control and budget for the costs of your dental care.
×